Sunday, November 19, 2017

I want to be rich!!

HOMILY FOR THE 33rd SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME, November 19, 2017:

A man once said, “I’m just one step away from being rich. All I need now is the money.” If I were to poll our congregation and ask how many of us would like to be rich, my guess is that I would see a lot of hands go up. Especially heading into the holiday season, we often think we could use just a little more help, and the lure of things like $100 million Powerball lotteries set our imaginations aflame. Being rich is something that our culture glorifies in song, TV, and movies, and something that most of us have probably thought of more than once.






Today’s Gospel gives us the parable of the talents about three men who had the opportunity to gain tremendous wealth. Now, sometimes a small word can make a big difference. We hear that word “talent”, and we probably assume that Jesus meant specific gifts much like the way we use the word today. We talk about things like athletic ability or intelligence as talents. We consider things like charisma or the ability to cook well as talents. But the word “talent” in our Gospel passage today had a very specific understanding. A talent was a monetary figure that was equal to 6,000 days’ wages. That’s a lot of money. To put it in contemporary standards, given the current average annual salary in America, one talent today would be about $130,000 – a significant amount by any stretch of the imagination. So, even the man in our parable who only received one talent was off to a great start.

But, of course, if we think that this parable is Jesus version of Warren Buffet’s How to Get Rich and Become Successful, we would be distorting its meaning. Jesus isn’t given us investment strategies for our 401K today. As always, Jesus is leading us into something deeper. Yes, He is talking about the way we use our time and our gifts, but not merely so that we maximize our return on investment. Jesus’ focus today is to remind us the gifts and talents that we have received do need to be invested – to get a good return, they must be invested in ‘the Kingdom of God.’ In other words, they are mean to help us become the holy people God has created us to be. That is our greatest success

To the question, do you want to be rich, Jesus would respond today, “You already are.” The reality is that we all start off rich – no matter what our bank accounts say about it. For example, Psalm 103 reminds us that God is slow to anger, rich in compassion; and in his letter to the Ephesians, St. Paul speaks about God being rich in mercy. And, just like the master giving talents to his servants, God has invested these gifts in us from the moment of our baptism. We’ve all received such profound gifts from God – the gift of His merciful love, the gift of His Son Jesus, the very gift of life itself. And we receive these gifts over and over again in all the sacraments – so profoundly in the Eucharist and Reconciliation. We are rich indeed.

But, just like the servants in today’s parable, God expects us to do something with these gifts. He wants us to invest them and multiply them and get a great return on our investment. God isn’t asking us today what kind of investor we are with our dollars and cents. But, God is asking us how have we invested His love in the world? Have we multiplied God’s forgiveness to the people around us? Have we gotten a good return on His compassion? How have we multiplied His joy in our hearts, in our homes, in our community?

In today’s Gospel, the man who received the one talent was paralyzed with fear – a fear that kept him from appreciating what he had received, so much so that he didn’t share it, he didn’t multiply it, instead, he dug a big hole and hid it away. And sometimes, we can act in the same way. Especially in our world today where it seems every conversation is fraught with divisiveness and anger, we can be afraid to speak a word of love. In our relationships, our pride can keep us from being the first one to break the ice and offer forgiveness. St. Theresa of Avila said that we’re often tempted to live in the past or in the future; but, in the end, the only place we can actually love God and others is in the present. This is where we’re called to invest.

The servant given the single talent, didn’t even try to respond to the trust that the master had shown him. The Lord today is calling us simply to try. How much love, joy, kindness, compassion, and forgiveness can we share and multiply in our world? This is what God calls us to invest. And our world will be better for it.

Jesus invites us to recognize the gifts, the talents, that we’ve received – the endless gift of God’s love and mercy – and then to do all that we can to share and multiply those gifts in our world. And, when we have lived a life of helping God to multiply that love and mercy in our world, we too will hear Him say to us, “Come, share your master’s joy!”

May the Lord give you peace.

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