Saturday, August 5, 2017

Transform me, Lord












HOMILY FOR THE TRANSFIGURATION OF THE LORD, August 6, 2017:

Many years ago, for one summer, I got to be a member of the Fighting Irish as I took summer courses at the famous University of Notre Dame. At the center of Notre Dame’s campus is the Basilica of the Sacred Heart. Every day, I would pray there and like most Catholics, I would always sit in the same spot, next to the same person. For weeks, this man and I didn’t speak to each other beyond a nod of the head and the sign of peace. But, every day I noticed what a beautiful singing voice he had. After about a month, I thought to myself, “Maybe no one has ever affirmed his singing.” So, after Mass one day, I introduced myself and said to him, “I don’t know if anyone has ever told you this before, but you really have a beautiful voice. You should consider using that gift that God has given you.” A small smile crossed his face, he shook my hand and said, “Hi Tom. My name is Michael Joncas.” Now, you may not recognize that name right away, but Michael Joncas is one of the most famous Catholic composers today. He has written such beautiful hymns as, “Take and Eat,” “When We Eat This Bread,” and most famously “On Eagle’s Wings.” I, of course, turned 20 shades of red and finally said, “Well, I guess you are making good use of that gift.”

But, in that moment, I instantly saw this man in a different light. It was a revelation that changed forever the way I would look at him. And, once I knew who he really was – once I had a fuller picture of his true identity – I wanted to stay there with him as long as I could and talk about liturgy and music and theChurch. But, eventually we had to return to get on with our day.Something like this is happening in our Gospel today. Peter, James and John, went up the mountain with Jesus to pray. But, they went up with the Jesus they already knew – a spectacular Jesus to be sure, one who heals, forgives, preaches with authority – but they hadn’t seen anything yet. Before their very eyes, Jesus is transfigured into unbelievable glory, and he is joined by Moses and Elijah – the three of them representing the fullness of God’s divine revelation. Their immediate reaction, “It is good that we are here!” They would never look at Jesus in the same way again, and wanted to hold on to that moment for as long as they could.

We are not unlike them. We too long for moments when God reveals Himself to us. Transfiguration is not only what we hear in the Gospel. It is something we can experience regularly in our lives. It is what takes place in this and every Mass if we open our minds, our hearts, our lives to it. Just think about it. God’s Word starts out as mere ink on a page, but it is transfigured through the Lector proclaiming it into a revelation of God - God’s message for us - that takes root in our hearts. The Eucharist starts out as nothing more than simple bread and wine, but it too is transfigured through the hands of the priest and the work of the Holy Spirit into the very presence of Jesus in our midst – His true Body and Blood – and once received, that presence of Jesus is within us. And, our reaction each and every Sunday should be: “It is good that we are here! Can we stay forever?”

The problem is that our eyes and our hearts are too often shielded from God’s presence right in front of us. They get shielded by our own concerns and struggles; shielded by our own hurts and pains; shielded even by the familiarity of experiencing Mass over and over again. But that doesn’t change what happens here - God wants to reveal Himself to us. Jesus wants us to hear His Words for us, to see and receive His Body and Blood. Why? So, that we too can be transfigured into what God wants us to be; so that we can go forth from this place and transfigure our homes, our workplace, our community, our relationships, into that glorious and holy reality that Jesus came here to share with us.

Transfiguration is an experience, a glimpse, of the full glory of God in Jesus. When Jesus arrived at the mountain top His appearance changed and literally shone brightly with God’s glory. Jesus shone with the glory that caused Moses to shine that day on the mountain when the 10 Commandments were given to him from Heaven. He shone with the glory that carried Elijah up to Heaven's height - gone from this world, but alive in the next. He shone with the glory of His own baptismal day, when His Father's voice was heard to say: "This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased" - and indeed those words first uttered at the River are repeated on the Mountaintop of Transfiguration.

As we today ascend this mountaintop where God wants to reveal Himself to us, let us shake whatever shields our minds and hearts from seeing Him. Let us leave this place radiant from our encounter with the God who loves us. “It is good that we are here.” Let us behold God’s glory and bring that glory to everyone we meet.

May the Lord give you peace.

1 comment:

  1. Thank you, a Father. Beautiful words, indeed. Being a relatively new Prodigal son, as a result of the Year of Mercy and Pope Francis' stellar example as well as message, I am constantly aware of and pray for, transformation and transfiguration in my own life.
    Please keep me in your prayers and keep up the good fight of faith. Your messages are inspirational. God bless you!

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